First American Crucifixion (Witches?)

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First American Crucifixion

By Scott Lewis, SOUTHAMPTON, NY — Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

It was a festive Fourth (4th) of July in Southampton. Ten thousand spectators attended one of the finest parades in the country adorned with loud fire department engine companies, local bands and from neighboring towns, marching Shinnecock Native Americans, Colonial American actors hauling cannons and muskets while carrying their associated banners down Main Street.

In that instant, Scott found it ironic that such attention would be paid to the celebration of the Declaration of Independence. That same year, the village was celebrating its’ 375th year as a British settlement. “Institutional habit,” he thought.

Consequently, Scott left for his house. He was determined to find out who really founded Southampton, either because this point in history had slipped through his curriculum or it was his a unity of Spirit; or, what Christians describe as the presence of the Father.

Upon his first Google search from his workstation, he discovered the Honorable Anne Hutchinson. “You know of her,” Scott thought. “Is it coincidence?” I think not Scott thought. “She has a parkway named after her (a.k.a. The Hutch)”. Scott learned in that moment of illumination that she was the first to turn from the ungodly rituals occurring within the first churches.

Scott called his friend Juan who is a real life guardian of the truth, and said “Juan, get this, I made another discovery regarding the Puritans on 4th of July. It is a tale from the crypt. Anne was an outspoken critic of the church, as I am of the church’s charter. As it turns out, Anne came over with the Halsey family from England in 1630s on the ship titled, Hopewell. You know the Halsey’s, Juan; I took you over to their farm stand. Remember the Green Thumb?” Juan said, “Yes”. Scott said, “I get the feeling from the church reenactment on Founders day that Anne, treated as cattle at King Charles’s command, caused her to turn on him. Anne challenged him using scripture as her guide. The Father, or scripture, led her; she knew the scripture would prevail over his edicts, and the ancient Necronomicon, or Satanic Babylonian text that was circulating in Salem, MA in those days.” Juan said, “Wow.”

Scott continued, “Thus, she began preaching, which was a canonist revolutionary act by a woman with twelve (12) children that lived; having as many children as possible was a colonization strategy. As you said Juan, “the tongue is a tool that can bring the treasure of life, or the treasure of death.”

I found the verse that coincides with that thought, ‘The good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth what is good; and the evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth what is evil, for his mouth speaks from that which fills his heart.’ However, Anne knew all too well her preaching would seal her fate like that of John the Baptist, and Jesus the Nazarene, Scott thought.

Juan responded, “I bet our First (1st) Amendment rights were documented because of her sacrifice, along with John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazarene followed by Anne.  Can you blame her for the turn? They turned the church into a courthouse and IRS building.”

Scott said, “No, from what I read, her conviction reminds me of you, Juan. You must be woven from the same moral fiber.” As it turns out, Juan had the same Christian fiber, by way of visits by Christian missions to the Dominican Republic.

Scott went on, “Juan, picture this: Anne sitting in the pews of first church back in 1637. She is witnessing a parishioner getting a tithing by the Clergy. Disturbed for the last time, Anne stands up and says enough, “I denounce the King’s edicts since God had already provided them for our new land. Alternatively, something like it.”

Juan said, “I can see why you’re so driven by rehashing these events. First Church didn’t include her outburst during their reenactment”.

Scott nodded in agreement and went on, “I’m sure, the King’s new bride would not subscribe to that kind of disloyalty, especially by another woman.”

Scott continued, “According to local author Mac Griswold’s new book”, ‘Hutchinson’s accusers (who were also her judges) hated Hutchinson for her certainty of her eternal salvation through grace alone, that gift of God that could free men and women from the obligation to do good on earth, and for her refusal to serve their ministers and observe colonial law with the exactitude they required from her. They also hated Hutchinson for her intellectual agility.’

Scott paused, “Juan, as it turns out, the situation erupted into what is commonly called the Antinomian Controversy, resulting in her 1637 trial, which was a sneaky way to banish supposed heretics from the colony. I found some quotes from her trial in Boston I wanted to share with you:

‘As I understand it, laws, commands, rules and edicts are for those who have not the light which makes plain the pathway.’

Scott said, “I love that quote. Don’t you Juan?” Scott went on about Anne. She also said, ‘One may preach a covenant of grace more clearly than another… But when they preach a covenant of works for salvation that is not truth’

Scott continued, “She understood something had to be done. Regrettably, she was banished from the colony. She retreated to the Bronx, NY, where she found refuge on a Dutch plantation.”

Juan interjected, “Yes, in those days, they did not try people fairly, especially Anne. It was the Kings way or the highway to the gallows.” Juan recalled a passage from the book of James, which Anne knew well: ‘Brothers and sisters do not slander one another. Anyone who speaks against a brother or sister or judges them speaks against the law and judges it. When you judge the law, you are not keeping it, but sitting in judgment on it. There is only one Lawgiver and Judge, the one who is able to save and destroy. But you—who are you to judge your neighbor?’

Scott responded, “Yes, Anne, among these other scattered believers in scripture rather than the pulpit needed to be very aware of satanic forces, or the forces that resist, where the body becomes a vessel for them. No doubt, the principalities of darkness would seek to bring discord amongst the believers in Christ: try to draw many away from the faith and make many give up. It is my understanding that God uses trials to strengthen our faith and Satan uses trials to weaken our faith.”

Juan said, “Hey that Dark Age stuff reminds me: wasn’t that era of witchcraft?”

Scott answered, “Yes, they had witch hunts here in East Hampton. One of the King’s men, Governor Winthrop, claimed that Anne’s wickedness brought about spina bifida in children. Do you know why they really burned witches at the stake?”

Juan, “Was it Superstition?”

“No” said Scott. “Do you remember having met Jacque Fresco, Social Engineer of the Venus Project?”

Juan, “Yes”

Scott, “He made me aware that the burnings were over resources. Do you know how the Kings minions were rewarded after burning a witch?”

Juan, “No”

Scott said, “As it turns out, they would receive their property. Pretty sick, ha? This is why Mr. Fresco advocates we move our society to a resource based economy because this barbaric behavior has not stopped.”

Juan, “Todays, banking Hun dungeon housing crisis.”

Scott continued, “By the way, historians would have you believe that a Native American killed Anne. From my perspective, I find it more plausible that a bounty hunter of King Charles’s took her out, since she was in on the colonization effort from the beginning. She knew everything so she went to her Dutch friends in the Bronx to warn them of the impeding land grab. As you know, the victor writes history.”

After learning from Juan, and pausing for him to recite Galatians,  ‘But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.’ And he added, ‘For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another.’

“That was great, Juan. Let us set the record straight regarding the founders of Southampton.  I declare the Hutchinson family as one. Anne escaped persecution, started her own ministry, which was why we have the first amendment. Dutch families (i.e. Schenck) too for their support of Anne, and lest not forget the Gumbs, a member of the Shinnecock Nation, for embracing the Dutch and English at the outset. The attribute that emblematically defines a founder is GRACE. Anne made sacrifices for God’s glory and freedom! That is what defines a founder. Let us tell Dan’s Papers. The readers can make the determination for themselves on how Southampton evolved.” Scott, ended.

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